- Settings:
Page
Normal
Plain layout without fancy styles
Font
Normal
Large fonts
Very large fonts
Colour
Normal
Restful colour scheme
Light text on a dark background

Note: user account creation on this site has been disabled.

Programming, speculative fiction, science, technology
Powered by Drupal, an open source content management system
Scope
Include Children
If you select a term with children (sub-terms), do you want those child terms automatically included in the search? This requires that "Items containing" be "any."
Categories

Everything in the Events vocabulary

"Events" is used for: Convention Post, Page, Story.

People mentioned in the articles

"People" is used for: Page, Convention Post, Story.

Themes mentioned in the article

"Themes" is used for: Page, Convention Post, Story.
Skip to top of page

writing

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/draganos/sf.geekitude.com/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Ted Chiang on lifelogging: a speech and a discussion with the audience at ArmadilloCon 2014

IMG_1482 Ted Chiang speaks about lifelogging at the ArmadilloCon 2014.

Lifelogging is an emerging trend of recording every, or nearly every moment of your life. A simple example of lifelogging would be wearing a video recorder that would record continuous video and audio of everything you see and do. Ted Chiang used this example to speculate about how lifelogging would change our society. At the end he answered the audience's questions and engaged in a discussion regarding some points, such as: would lifelogging encourage us to craft our lives as stories, and thus become better people? Doesn't forgetting play a big role in getting over a trauma? Doesn't forgetting go a long way towards forgiving? What if your memories are hacked? Who has control over shared memories?

Salman Rushdie at the Texas Book Festival in 2005

CIMG0970 Evan Smith (left) interviewing Salman Rushdie at the Texas Book Festival 2005

Texas Book Festival took place October 29 - 30, 2005 in Austin, TX, and featured some well known authors like Lemony Snicket and Salman Rushdie. I went to see Salman Rushdie being interviewed by Evan Smith.

Among the topics touched upon at the interview there was the inevitable topic of what Rushdie euphemistically referred to as the publicity agency from Tehran", writerly quirks (where do characters' names come from?), which parts of his books are autobiographical; in the Q&A session he gave an advice to an ex-Muslim woman who said her life would be in danger if she publishes a book on Al Qaeda she has written; what could be done to help Americans understand Muslim world, and vice versa; literary criticism summed up in a word "jump", and other things.

Ted Chiang interview at ArmadilloCon 2014

At ArmadilloCon 2014, Jayme Lynn Blaschke interviewed Ted Chiang, one of the two writer Guests of Honor. Here are some topics they talked about: linguistics, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis and "The Story of Your Life", the possibility of it being turned into the movie -- this was 2 years before the story got turned into the movie "Arrival"; is Ted Chiang's fiction influenced by the environment; writing the ending first, his story length, and whether he is going to expand "Liking What You See" into a longer story; does he ever plan to write a novel; the first stories he wrote as a teen; who were his influences; and what appeal does he find in discredited scientific theories, such as preformation (on which his story "72 Letters" is based).

How Friendly Were Frodo and Sam? An ApolloCon 2007 panel

CIMG6461Selina Rosen and Jess Nevins

Description in the program book: Was there a homoerotic subtext to Lord of the Rings? Is subtext in the eye of the beholder, or is Spec Fic friendlier to GLBT characters and readings than the mainstream? Panelists discuss the perception of alternative sexualities in SF/F.

Panelists: Alexis Glynn Latner (moderator), Lee Martindale, Jess Nevins, Selina Rosen, Mel. White

What was it really about:

The discussion didn't focus so much about a relationship between Frodo and Sam (though there was some speculation), or even whether SF is friendlier to gay / lesbian / bi /transsexual (GLBT) characters than mainstream literature. Mostly it revolved around fan fiction, especially slash fiction.

Pictures from ApolloCon 2007 are in my photo gallery.

Editing 101: Self-editing for the Spec Fic Writer: an ApolloCon 2007 panel

CIMG6517 Rosemary Clement-Moore at ApolloCon 2007

Panelists discuss the process of self-editing. And no, we don't mean just chucking it out the window and starting over. How can you honestly and dispassionately proof and edit your writing? Start with the ending and write toward the beginning; kill your darlings; summarize a scene in one sentence. Finally, funny tales from editors' trenches.

Panelists: Rosemary Clement-Moore, Melanie Miller Fletcher, Alexis Glynn Latner, Julia Mandala, Barbara Winter

.

Pictures from ApolloCon 2007 are in my photo gallery.

More blog posts from ApolloCon 2007 (in my blog)

More blog posts from other ApolloCons (in my blog)

John Scalzi's Guest of Honor interview: ArmadilloCon 2008

John Scalzi's interview took a different format than the usual Guest of Honor interview. There was no interviewer; Scalzi paced back and forth, shooting the breeze with the audience. He probably didn't say anything one wouldn't find on his blog. It's how he said those things that made him so entertaining. He acted out various stories from his life as little skits, from a Hugo winner's attitude to getting to know 16-year-old girls. He also commented on Neal Stephenson, openly admitted to stealing from other authors, and talked about why he could not afford to be as polemical in "Old Man's War" as Heinlein was in "Starship Troopers". Finally, he revealed an unexpected fact about himself.

The pictures from ArmadilloCon 2008 can be found in my photo gallery.

ArmadilloCon 2008 writers' workshop: pros' advice and a story construction game

P1010528 Don Webb, Julie Kenner, and Kimberly Frost

The writers' workshop started with advice panels on writing. Some of the advice the pros gave was debunking common writing myths, so in a way it was metaadvice. Sheila Williams, the editor guest of honor, shared some good, compelling pieces of wisdom. It's all the more valuable coming from the mouth of the Asimov's editor.

Then Don Webb conducts an audience participation game. He and the audience collaboratively construct outlines for two genre stories: an immuno-defficient woman in a bubble encounters a giant germ (horror) and a little slave boy in the 19th century American south meets aliens (science fiction). For this, the audience needs to decide: the story's genre (SF, F or H), who is the protagonist, where or when the story is taking place, and, most importantly, what is the driving force for the story. If it's horror, what is the protagonist afraid of? If they are aliens, what do they want?

After the critique sessions, ArmadilloCon guest of honor John Scalzi gave a closing speech for the workshop students on the power of suck.

The pictures from the writing workshop and the rest of ArmadilloCon 2008 can be found on my web site.