- Settings:
Page
Normal
Plain layout without fancy styles
Font
Normal
Large fonts
Very large fonts
Colour
Normal
Restful colour scheme
Light text on a dark background

Note: user account creation on this site has been disabled.

Programming, speculative fiction, science, technology
Powered by Drupal, an open source content management system
Scope
Include Children
If you select a term with children (sub-terms), do you want those child terms automatically included in the search? This requires that "Items containing" be "any."
Categories

Everything in the Events vocabulary

"Events" is used for: Convention Post, Page, Story.

People mentioned in the articles

"People" is used for: Page, Convention Post, Story.

Themes mentioned in the article

"Themes" is used for: Page, Convention Post, Story.
Skip to top of page

The Tron Guy

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/draganos/sf.geekitude.com/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Larval Mode: a Linucon 2005 panel

The name Larval Mode comes from the Hacker's Dictionary where it means the state of being a novice programmer or techie. The panelists were Eric Raymond and "one of the unsung heroes of the internet" John Quarterman. They did this panel specifically for a group of high school students who travelled to Linucon.

Here are some topics they talked about.

I can't guarantee that I quoted Eric Raymond or John Quarterman correctly, but I tried to capture the essence of what they said.

Pros and cons of the GNU General Public License: Linucon 2005

CIMG0927 Jay Maynard in his alternative Tron costume

Synopsis from Linucon program book: "The most popular open source license, the GPL, inspires controversy to this day. Eric Raymond recently expressed some ambivalence about it, so he and his lawyer wife Cathy are moderating this panel, with Jay Maynard, a.k.a. The Tron Guy speaking out against the GPL and Rob Landley defending it."

One of Rob Landley's pro-GPL arguments is that it can prevent a project from forking. Jay Maynard claims credit for coining the term General Public Virus. His objection to GPL lies in its ideological agenda. Rob says GPL keeps companies from taking open source code, incorporating it into their products and making money off of someone else's work without giving back to the community. Jay objects that even if companies did that, the good consequences of this action would outweigh the bad. Eric Raymond then inserts himself physically and ideologically between these two "nutcase friends" of his. His position is that GPL is slowing down the adoption of open source, because it is often incorrectly perceived that a company that uses open source software would be obligated to blow open their entire intellectual property. Furthermore, he says, GPL is based on the assumption that defecting from the open source community is attractive, whereas in reality it is its own punishment. Both sides use Linksys as an example to support their arguments. :-) They briefly debate whether the reason BSD did not become as popular as Linux was due to its license, or, as Eric Raymond argues, because they got their social machinery wrong.

Some pictures from this panel can be found in my Linucon 2005 photo gallery.

Read more about The Tron Guy in my blog.

Costuming 101: a panel at Linucon 2004

EX000045 The Tron Guy up close

Synopsis from Linucon program book: Wanting to build a costume? Grab a seat for some tips and tricks from those who know.

Panelists: Kim Kofmel, Jay Maynard, Cathy Raymond

My impression. There are several ways you can win a costume award at a masquerade. By making audience laugh, for example. By being original. There is also a fairly self-explanatory "workmanship" category. This panel devoted quite a bit of space to the tips and tricks of how to make a costume, and they managed to be quite entertaining while doing that. Far from being tedious, their discussion was enlivened with all kinds of titillating details from the costume history. The panelists also spoke about the psychology of wearing a costume, and the motivation for making one in the first place. All in all, an interesting panel even for those who, like myself, have only a marginal interest in costuming.

Pictures from Linucon 2004 can be found in my photo gallery.

Read more about The Tron Guy in my blog.